News for April 2014

Legal issues in computer security research

This Thursday, I gave a talk at AtlSecCon 2014. The weather threw a wrench in the organizers' plans, but they managed to pull off a solid conference. Unfortunately, the talks weren't recorded this year. The slides are posted on speakerdeck, and are embedded below the fold.

I also reprised this talk at NSLUG, and recorded audio, now posted on SoundCloud, and also embedded below the fold.

Finally: late last year, I wrote 3 posts exploring Canada's computer crime laws (1, 2, 3) which were initial versions of work that eventually became two papers I submitted this semester for a directed studies course. If you were interested in those posts, I've embedded the final PDFs below. The talk is a condensed version of that work.

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Recovering from heartbleed

Heartbleed is a critical vulnerability in OpenSSL revealed yesterday. I'm not sure it could be more serious: it allows an attacker to connect to your server and use the TLS heartbeat extension to obtain 64k of server memory (and do it again to get another 64k and again and...) -- while leaving no traces in logs. That server memory might include primary key material (private keys), secondary key material (usernames and passwords), and collateral (memory addresses, canaries used to detect overflow, etc)
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